Sometimes, minor children in Georgia cannot rely on their parents to provide appropriate levels of supervision and care. In such cases, the court system may approve guardians or conservators to protect the interests of these kids.

The reasons why a child might need a court appointed guardian or conservator vary. In some cases, a child’s parents are dead, have a severe mental illness or suffer from incapacity due to disability. In these cases, it may be necessary to appoint a guardian who can make appropriate decisions about the child’s life and welfare. For example, the guardian may be able to make decisions regarding a child’s education, medical care, and other aspects of their day-to-day life.

If someone is appointed as a guardian, the court may require them to undergo a criminal background check. In addition, the guardian may be required to file regular reports with the court so that the judge knows that the minor is being well cared for.

Sometimes, a child may inherit money that is not in a trust or be the beneficiary of a financial settlement. The court could appoint a conservator to oversee and manage these funds until the child comes of age. Conservators must undergo a criminal background check and will be required to file regular statements showing that the funds are being appropriately managed.

Individuals who are concerned about minor guardianship and conservatorship issues might benefit from speaking with an experienced attorney. A lawyer could review the client’s case and make recommendations as to whether a guardian or conservator is needed.