Become a parent’s guardian

On Behalf of | Jul 21, 2020 | Guardianships & Conservatorships |

As people age, they may lose the ability to make important decisions about their lives. In this situation, adult children may need to become their parents’ guardian.

As a legal guardian, adults carry out many responsibilities for their parents. According to AgingCare.com, guardians manage a senior’s finances and other assets. They also make medical decisions and act as a legal representative. Adult children often serve in this capacity because they understand what their parents need. There are a few steps people need to take before they become a guardian.

Speak to the family

Before people go to a Georgia court, they should hold a family meeting. SeniorSafetyAdvice.com says that this ensures each adult child understands the situation and agrees that one of them should be the legal guardian of their parents. Discussing the situation can help families experience less conflict as they take care of their aging parents.

If possible, people should also speak to their parents about the situation. Some seniors may be incapable of managing any of their affairs. However, others may still feel they can take care of their own finances. In this situation, people need to make sure their parents understand their concerns and agree to the guardianship.

Work with the court

People have to file a petition to become a legal guardian. This petition shows why guardianship is necessary. People may need to explain their parents’ situation and provide records about a senior’s income and assets. People also need to explain the kind of guardianship powers they would like. In some situations, people may need to demonstrate that they tried other options, such as power of attorney, before seeking guardianship.

The court usually investigates the situation to see if a senior needs a guardian. Seniors may need a medical evaluation so the court can determine the extent of their mental faculties. Courts grant guardianship once they review all the evidence and determine the guardianship is in the senior’s best interests.

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