Guardianships & Conservatorships Archives

A parent is forgetful: Does that mean mental illness is present?

Many Georgia residents are adult children of aging parents. While some are helping their loved ones with long-term care planning issues, others are doing their best to help their mothers or fathers transition to assisted-living facilities. There are also many adult children who are dealing with the ravages of mental illness in the very people who loved and cared for them their whole lives.

Mental illness: What are the signs in the elderly?

As people age, they may experience any number of daily life challenges, from those relating to mobility to cognitive, emotional or other health conditions. Mental health is a main concern for the elderly as well. It is critical to know how recognize signs of mental illness, especially for those who have been tasked with managing long-term care for a parent or other loved one. Georgia residents currently dealing with such issues will want to read this post.  

Issues that can trigger mental illness in the elderly

Taking care of parents as they age can be a highly emotional and challenging experience as many adult children in Georgia can undoubtedly attest. Some situations are a bit more stressful than others, such as those involving a parent with mental illness. Mental decline is not always immediately apparent.

Comedian Tim Conway's family fighting over conservatorship

Georgia fans of the old Carol Burnett Show are likely also big fans of comic Tim Conway, a main player on the show for many years. Siadly, Conway has reportedly become afflicted with dementia. Unfortunately, one of his six children, a daughter, is battling his wife over conservatorship.

Time to choose a legal guardian? Read this first

When Georgia parents take on the solemn task of choosing adults to step in and become legally responsible for their children should they themselves die or become incapacitated, they often choose close family members to fulfill the role. However, choosing a legal guardian is a serious matter that parents should only make after considering various factors, including whom they believe would act in their children's best interests at all times. While it's easy and perhaps natural to want to choose relatives, the truth is, it might not always be the best decision.  

How mental illness can impact a person's estate

Many adult children in Georgia are helping to care for aging parents with health care concerns. In some situations, parents suffer from mental illness; in particular, dementia or Alzheimer-related symptoms. Beyond the sorrow of having to witness a parent's cognitive and mental decline, it can be stressful trying to keep on top of various estate-related issues that may arise.

Mental illness and other possible health problems for the elderly

Knowing that a mother or father is getting on in years but not being able to visit him or her everyday can cause an adult child to worry. It's understandable that aging parents would like to maintain as much independence as possible. Their children typically want the same for them but also want to make sure that living independently is what's best for their parents. If mental illness or another serious health problem is suspected, it may be time to access support resources in Georgia.

Questions regarding a court appointed guardian issue?

Any number of situations may arise in life that render a person incapable of making his or her own decisions about financial concerns and other important matters. From terminal illness to sudden incapacitation resulting from injuries in a motor vehicle collision or other type of accident, a court appointed guardian may be needed when an individual can no longer act on his or her own behalf. Many times, an adult child or other family member petitions a Georgia probate court to name a conservator or guardian.

To protect your loved one's wellbeing, planning truly is critical

The New York Times recently ran an in-depth story about one victim of financial exploitation by a companion-caregiver who was acting as guardian to an elderly gentleman. Initially, the woman contacted her companion's family saying that she was no longer able to care for the gentleman, who had dementia and other health issues.

How do you know when you are too old to manage money?

The good news is there's no obvious age at which a normally healthy person loses cognitive ability. People who are experiencing normal cognitive aging can often manage their financial affairs competently well into their 70s and 80s.

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